Sunday, May 23, 2010

South Florida Redeemed Again, This Time by Dinner

A while back I wrote about how a brunch at The Blue Moon Fish Company, in Coral Springs, Florida, rescued me from the culinary wasteland that is South Florida. Of course, I don't go to South Florida in search of great food, but if I'm going to visit my mother I always hope there's someplace decent we can go to. On my most recent visit we decided to try Blue Moon again, this time for dinner.

It was a Sunday night and we lucked out pricewise because they've just introduced a three-course dinner special (every night except Saturday), and you don't even have to be an early-bird. Blue Moon is a relatively upscale restaurant for the area, with most entrees in the $20-30 range. For the dinner special they offer a generous subset of the menu with a varied choice of appetizers and desserts free on top of the entree price.

I started with the tuna poki, marinated sashimi tuna served in a martini glass, accompanied by sushi rice and julienned vegetables. My main course was a really nice, plump piece of sweet-potato crusted corvina (Pacific sea bass, popular in Latin America--I had corvina in Peru), served with spinach, basmati rice and a Grand Marnier butter ($22 for the three-courses; my mother's rib eye was $28). The only misstep was a Jamaican rum and coconut creme brulee that wasn't a creme at all, but rather a runny liquid. Clearly something had gone wrong in the kitchen, since they served a perfectly decent creme brulee at brunch.

Blue Moon Fish Co.
10317 Royal Palm Boulevard
Coral Springs, Florida 33065

(954) 755-0002

2 Comments:

Blogger roysubs said...

why do you use "entree" when you mean "main course"?? I don't understand why Americans make such a mess of language ! (sorry, no offence intended, I just don't understand why Americans don't use language correctly. Entrée is a French word which means a small course *before* the main course i.e. a starter).

5:17 AM  
Blogger Peter Cherches said...

I take no offense to your spelling of "offence." I use the word that is perfectly well-established as the word for main course in American English regardless of the word's provenance.

11:39 AM  

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